Videos

Documentary
Music videos
Movie
Money animations
Art videos


Documentary

Blue girl

The work is a documentary film that centres on my good friend Mai Kovanen. We wanted to document our life at this time, and because Mai plays a very central role in our group of friends and is also a very distinctive and interesting person, we decided to describe her.

Jukka Blomroos & Anna Sangi
Helsingin kuvataidelukio
2016


Music videos

Kahvihuoneilmiö: Kavereita

They say that you can’t buy friends. Even so, those who are wealthiest seem to have more of them. At least so it seems. Whether one encounters a diverse social environment with friends is quite another matter.


Kahvihuoneilmiö:
Elias Hjelm: guitar/vocals/music/lyrics
Aleksi Harjunpää: guitar/backing vocals
Jasper Hytiti: drums
Tuukka Laaksonen: bass/backing vocals

Video team:
Eetu Korhonen: technical producer/photographer
Severi Laine: photography
Sampo Saloheimo: photography
Jussi Pohjavirta: photographic assistant
Essi Hurttila: photographic assistant
Erik Koskela: lights
Sami Porio: lighting assistant
Mikko Hyry: lighting assistant
Bella Iho: production assistant/Behind the scenes videos
Mira-Julia Riikonen and Roosa Hjelm: makeup
Sauli Norja: actor
Iris Riivari: actor
Leevi Mänttäri: actor

Pekka Rautio: executive producer

Vaskivuoren lukio
2016


Worm Zoo: (Money is) A Poor Excuse for the Rich

The deceitfulness of money, the continually growing importance of expressing ego and wealth in life and human relationships, now and in the future. But can one ever eliminate loneliness with money?


Worm Zoo:
Jenni Kosonen and Mira-Julia Riikonen

Videotiimi:
Eetu Korhonen: technical producer
Erik Koskela: lights
Jussi Pohjavirta: photographer
Sami Porio: technical assistant
Mikko Hyry: photographer
Bella: actor
Mira-Julia Riikonen: makeup
Bella Iho: production assistant/Behind the scenes videos

Pekka Rautio: executive producer

Vaskivuoren lukio
2016


Movie

Highway to Future

Our work Highway to the Future has been developed from our perspective on the possible scenarios of the future of Finland. The work is set in 2067, when a way to send video images into the past has been developed. In a short film, vlogger Marjutta Järvenheimo, captivated by enthusiasm inspired by a retroboom, interviews some of Finland’s influential people in 2067.

We started work on the project in August 2016. From the very beginning, we approached the subject via theatre improvisation, and therefore conducted various exercises around the theme. We generated ideas about characters and topics of discussion for an indicative manuscript, but we brought the characters to life only during shooting.

The improvisation started completely from scratch, and ideas arose mainly from moments of inspiration during improvisation. A fascinating feature of this was indeed the random remarks that grew into larger ideas. 

We shot the video in our school Vaskivuori Upper Secondary School, in the Sanomatalo building, behind the Kiasma Museum of Contemporary Art, in a private residence and in Stockmann’s Fazer café. All of the video shoots were in the can within a couple of weeks. Most of the time was spent on improvisation and editing.

Near the end of the editing stage, we experienced a tragic setback when our computer died and all the material was lost. Fortunately, bitspace eventually released its hostages, and now you can see it flirting in all its glory before you. Hope you enjoy it!

Jasmin Eväkoski, Emmi Orjatsalo, Sampo Saloheimo, Laura Tarhi, Mona Ylöne
Vaskivuoren lukio
2016


Money animations

Animations about money

00:08 Lauri Halttunen - Raining money
01:15 Ville Färm & Joonatan Toivari - Scavannger (work in progress)
02:28 Mona Rantala - Untitled
02:54 Anny Ståhlberg - Wishing well (for the future)
03:56 Julius Kerkis - Stony broke
04:22 Katja Nordfors - Wind

Helsingin kuvataidelukio
2016



Art video

Red Thread

Following the red thread through scenes of Helsinki reveals a certain vision of the future. The thread, which meanders everywhere, binds places and events in a maze-like fashion, while at the same time carrying the story forward. The idea arose by pondering what is important now and in the future – namely search for the red thread of life.

Emma Kamutta
Helsingin kuvataidelukio
2016


Stain

The video has no clear plot or story. Instead, the video employs a symbolist narrative, which is left to the viewer’s interpretation. The work draws on the idea of paper swans, which are like banknote motifs. We brought into our work influences from other videos that have depicted ink in water. Patterns formed by ink in water were, in our view, a visually elegant solution.

Janni Finnilä & Christian Haratani
Helsingin kuvataidelukio
2016


Forest

The theme of my work is Finland’s economic future, or the concrete issue about how Finland will make a living in 2067, exactly fifty years after the date of this exhibition.
The work consists of a video that shows the shadow of a tree swaying in the wind, projected on to the façade of a building. The tree is a pine, one of Finland’s most common species of tree.
I decided to design the shadow-theme work without thinking for long about other possible options. As a theme and a tool, shadow is familiar to me. Shadows and light reflections occur in very many of my everyday photographs. Photography is familiar, but I have not worked on or even planned light works in the past. Despite this non-existent experience, I chose out of pure interest the illumination of a building as an approach. The implementation of the work also includes a personal desire to expand my own artistic approaches and tools.
The work is connected to the subject of the exhibition via the symbolism of trees and shadows as well as the viewer’s associations and political and economic knowledge. The work comments on Finland’s economic future, but the actual opinion is formed by the viewer. The work is thus open to interpretation, and viewers themselves select whether the work forecasts dystopia or utopia.
To my mind, the work represents the contemporary art of today. New perspectives or approaches are not used in the work, but I feel that light and open treatment of the future like this was not as prevalent in, for example, the populist contemporary art that preceded the 21st century. I believe that I have had the opportunity to get to know and become interested in today’s video art thanks to Eija-Liisa Ahtila, in particular. It may be that her work “Vaakasuora-Horizontal” has influenced the birth of the idea of my tree-themed work.

Sarah Polyakov
Helsingin kuvataidelukio
2016