Photography

What might be valuable in the future?
Postcards to the future
Money and the future
The Finn of the future 


What might be valuable in the future?

With her photographs, Emma Kataja answers the question: What might have monetary value in the future or what might not be obtainable with money? For example, natural values, water and prized foodstuffs, such as coffee, are perceived to be valuable in the future. Things not obtainable with money in the future are, among other things, wisdom, mental health, friendship and immortality. Emma Kataja is from the Helsinki Upper Secondary School of Visual Arts.


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Emma Kataja
What might be valuable in the future or what might not be obtainable with money?
2016
Photograph


Postcards to the future

A series of postcards on the theme Greetings to the future!. The works ponder the kind of things we have today that 50 years from now may be history, things that will be merely a memory. Which things are changing right now and which in 2067 will no longer be as they once were? The artists are students of the Helsinki Upper Secondary School of Visual Arts.


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Raymi Alihaanperä
Untitled
2016
Tuloste

I wanted to tell in Printoutmy pictures that the future will value the past and preserve historical sculptures.


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Maija Karhula
Untitled
2016
Printout

The work consists of three playful images, which send greetings to the future. The themes of the images relate to remembering and the past, and are things that perhaps will not be seen in the future.


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Saara Klintrup
Untitled
2016
Printout


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Sofianna Lastikka
Untitled
2016
Printout


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Essi Lindgren
Change
2016
Printout

The photographs are inspired by the concealment of the streetscape by work sites as well as the major construction projects under way in Helsinki. Well-known landmarks and areas are hidden amid scaffolding and building materials. The characteristic attributes remains in place, however, as the surrounding environment changes.


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Katja Lindell
Untitled
2016
Printout

Greetings to the future! Kalasatama in Helsinki is currently a massive construction site. Will the buildings already appear old-fashioned in 2067?


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Lilja Mettälä
Untitled
2016
Printout

My series of postcards tells an old-fashioned person like me about important things that threaten to disappear in the future. One wonders whether anyone will still send paper letters, write hand-written notes or read paper books in 2067? I miss the times when snail mail was actively used. Traditional mail has been replaced almost completely by instant messaging services. I also do not understand e-books; they are not worthy to be called books. It is not the same thing to laze in a hammock clutching a gadget. There are no pages to turn and smell. Will anyone even know how to write in the future, when everything is digitalised? The brain will atrophy when machines handle everything. I want to present a small hint of nostalgia to the people of 2067. So greetings to the future, when my postcard finally reaches its destination.


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Ilona Palander
Untitled
2016
Printout

The work is untitled. The task was to make postcards for the future about issues that are currently going well or badly. I was in the city centre looking for ideas when I ran into a demonstration opposing Government spending cuts and decided to adopt it as my theme.


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Viivi Ponnikas
Untitled
2016
Printout


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Moby Siivonen
Measure of value
2016
Printout

In my work, I wanted to address a topical issue for myself – the student’s status in society. Because students can be who- or whatever, it was difficult to identify an issue that touched every student. As my direction of approach, I took humanity, because it touches every one of us. I feel safe in my own country, but even so I associate great fears with my future. The quality of education in Finland is excellent, and I wouldn’t want to see it abandoned.


Money and the future

In their images, the students combined meanings relating to money and the future. What will money mean in the future? How will we earn a living? The artists are students of the Helsinki Upper Secondary School of Visual Arts.


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Savanna Hamaro
Wash your mouth
2016
Digital image

My work tells of how money speaks on our behalf. Society revolves around rich people, and they accordingly have great influence.


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Aino Koivisto
Untitled
2016
Digital image


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Veli-Matti Koskikallio
Wasted opportunities
2016
Digital image

Expertise accumulates over time like savings in a bank. It may go easily to waste, however. Skills are lost, if they are not maintained by practicing..


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Katja Lindell
Untitled
2016
Digital image

There is already a shortage of clean water in the world today. Fifty years from now, freshwater, along with natural resources, may be one of Finland’s most valuable resources.


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Isa Nurmi
Untitled
2016
Digital image


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Sanni Puoskari
Prosperity from nature
2016
Digital image

I was inspired by the combination of money and nature. Our banknotes have changed into credit cards, and this will lead to further change. Nature should be increasingly important in the future.


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Elias Tauria
Cleft
2016
Digital image

The source of inspiration for the work was to examine the importance of money in the future. The work draws on a future in which money has no financial significance and can therefore be used as material. The work also examines people as well as the absurdity and irrelevance of pursuing perfection in the future. The ultimate meaning of a human head, moreover, is only to be a book with a face on the cover looking emptily into the future.


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Lotta Veirto
Digits
2016
Digital image

In my work, I wanted to portray digitalisation and Finland’s future. Everything’s becoming increasingly virtual, and money is no exception. Innovations come from people, however. To realise them, we need creativity, expertise and humanity.


The Finn of the future

Inka Mattila’s and Saara Taussi’s photographs consider which things are changing right now and what kind of phenomena will be different in the future from today, 2017. How might these phenomena be visible in personal profiles? Thoughts emerge about, for example, migrations of peoples, immigration, new-look Finns, transfer of technology to the skin, changing gender roles. Mattila and Taussi are from the Helsinki Upper Secondary School of Visual Arts.


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Inka Mattila
The Finn of the future
2016
Photograph


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Saara Taussi
The Finn of the future
2016
Photograph