Painting and drawing

Comical families
Where will Finland bathe?
Playing Cards
Cartoons 
Proverbs


Comical families

The digitally drawn and painted cards present the artists’ visions of Finns and their occupations in 2067. The artists are students of the Helsinki Upper Secondary School of Visual Arts


Viljami Graniittiaho
New family
2016
Digital painting

The works features one possible family in a changing world. A neuroscientist and his partner, who prevents increasingly common ecological disasters, and their garden designer friend.


Karoliina Joenkari
Untitled
2016
Coloured pencils


Siru Kivinen
Homeless street musicians
2016
Watercolour

The idea of the work comes from close at hand, from my own life and a possible view of the future. As a child, I said I wanted to be an artist, and I was told that one couldn’t live on art. However, I also don’t want to live without it, so I intend to try, and if it drives me on to the street, then so be it. Long live Finland, for me.


Anni Matikainen
Untitled
2016
Watercolour

I was inspired by the assignment, in which I had to imagine a family fifty years from now. I brought the futuristic dimension to the fore through the children’s colourful hair and cyborg body parts. The work is untitled.



Anni Ståhlberg
Subscribelssons
2016
Opaque paint

The subject of the work was to visualise what kind of professions there will be in Finland in the future. I speculate on the continuing growth in popularity of the social media, and how it might be possible to put bread on the table by making videos for the internet. I realised the images with the technique I felt most comfortable with, namely water-soluble pastels.


Miisa Törmänen
Future hopes
2016
Digital painting

The work tells of how people, over time, will evolve into weapons and all the time closer to the centre point of nuclear war, as reflected by decreasing humanity and increasing mechanisation of the human body as well as drastic changes in the range of personal weaponry.


Jenni Vesanen
Family of the future
2016
Digital painting

The assignment was to create a set of cards depicting Finnish families and other groups 50 years from now. I try in my work to convey Finland’s increasing multiculturalism, technological development and the emphasis of social factors in the professions of the future.


Ylva Wahlström
Healthy hedonism
2016
Pastel

I pondered the possibilities of virtual reality to experience matters that in real life are forbidden for health reasons. I wanted my works to be challenging and thought-provoking, so I selected intoxicants for my experiences.


Where will Finland bathe?

The artists of the series of works Where will Finland bathe? are students of the Helsinki Upper Secondary School of Visual Arts.


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Anna Alava
Untitled
2016
Plastic and drawing

As consumption increases, the amount of trash has also increased. Recycling and processing of trash have improved, but the situation could be better. I hope that my work will inspire people to consume less and recycle more.


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Viljami Graniittiaho
Untitled
2016
Watercolour


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Cilla Heldan
Untitled
2016
Watercolour


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Eeva Immonen
Untitled
2016
Drawing


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Liisa Kantokorpi
Untitled
2016
Watercolour


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Josua Kerkis
Untitled
2016
Watercolour


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Nenna Koponen
Untitled
2016
Watercolour


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Marika Lahdenperä
Untitled
2016
Watercolour


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Emma Lehtinen
Untitled
2016
Watercolour


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Anni Matturi
Untitled
2016
Watercolour


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Elina Ojanen
Untitled
2016
Watercolour


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Suvi Pensala
Untitled
2016
Watercolour


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Mona Rantala
Untitled
2016
Watercolour

Finland’s strength, now and in the future, is nature, especially water and snow. Elsewhere in the world, water may diminish or even disappear, so it will become a valuable resource that will still be found in Finland. I have described the Finn of the future in pure icy water.


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Tuulia Rytkönen
Untitled
2016
Watercolour


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Marjatta Sutela
Untitled
2016
Watercolour


Playing Cards

Futuristic series of playing cards.


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Juulia Ulpuvaara
Playing Cards
2016
Digital painting

The themes of the cards are characters from the imagination of my “sister” and I, namely Arai (clubs), Skay (diamonds), Toku (spades) and Reid (hearts), who live in isolation on an island after the nearly total collapse of human civilisation in a world contaminated by environmental toxins and pollutants. Arai, Skay and Toku are genetically modified products of research whose original purpose was to create people able to survive in conditions harsher than today when the future seemed bleak. Some of the genetically modified people were intended to be slaves, some are the offspring of parents who wanted gene therapy for their children. The characters have mainly grown from childhood in large facilities, such as on the island settled by Arai, Skay, Toku and Reid. The facility on the island has been abandoned since the characters’ childhood. Reid is the only one of the four who is human. In a world where there is no civilisation and nearly all the old knowledge has been forgotten, there is simply no reason to care. Robots and lower-intelligence animal figures take care of greenhouses, and everything goes along reasonably peacefully, if one ignores chance encounters with mutants, alien creatures, and the environmental threats of an unstable global environment. The world has been created as a means of escape for us children, when everything doesn’t go quite to plan in life.



Cartoons

One-frame cartoon strips, which tell of money, income and pennilessness. The perspectives are critical, admiring, ironic and satirical. The carton trips also present the artists’ own opinions. The artists are students of the Helsinki Upper Secondary School of Visual Arts.


Jaana Aaltonen
Perhaps, then, the day after tomorrow
2016
Ink and pencil on paper

The work tells of people’s different perceptions of financial worth, while addressing differing opinions about what constitutes a good use for money.


Eleonora Bergholm
Untitled
2016
Ink and pencil on paper

Through my cartoon, I want to comment on the tricks employed by shops to encourage people to buy and consume. I depicted these situations in my work.


Janne Granlund
Untitled
2016
Ink and pencil on paper


Noora Hovatov
Cuts
2016
Ink and pencil on paper

The work is inspired by the spending cuts made this year and particularly those affected by the cuts. I wanted to tell in my work, or rather to comment on in my work, what may result from the cuts. The title of the work is simply “Cuts”.


Jerri Keto
Massive
2016
Ink and pencil on paper

I want to show in my work how Finland is becoming increasingly multicultural.


Jasmiina Kuronen
Untitled
2016
Ink and pencil on paper


Kiia Laurila
Young money cash money
2016
Ink and pencil on paper

The work addresses the generation gap and how older people do not understand young people’s financial distress.


Ella Nikulainen
Money talks
2016
Ink and pencil on paper

The starting point of my work is a reflection on the importance of money in modern society. Money is valued more and more, and it is considered a sign of success.


Anna-Maria Närä
Untitled
2016
Ink and pencil on paper


Meri Partanen
Untitled
2016
Ink and pencil on paper


Olivia Pihamaa
Untitled
2016
Ink and pencil on paper


Jade Rantala
Untitled
2016
Ink and pencil on paper


Taru Saarelainen
Spending cuts bingo
2016
Ink and pencil on paper

The title of my one-frame cartoon strip is ‘Spending cuts bingo’, inspired by the Government’s sometimes seemingly endless cuts.


Anzhej Soboleva
Untitled
2016
Ink and pencil on paper



Veera Tirinen
Untitled
2016
Ink and pencil on paper


Proverbs

One-frame cartoon strips, which tell of money, income and pennilessness. The perspectives are critical, admiring, ironic and satirical. The carton trips also present the artists’ own opinions. The artists are students of the Helsinki Upper Secondary School of Visual Arts.


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Erika Airo
Greed is good at taking, but not at giving
2016
Watercolour

When I read the proverb, I knew immediately that I wanted to make an apt, modern-day version of it. I wanted to portray the proverb as a greedy, self-centred person, who reaches in every direction to grab for themselves everything they can get their hands on. This greedy person is so self-centred that they cannot give anything to others, even when it would go to a good cause. I made this picture because, today, people seem all too often to be like this.


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Nelli Honkela
Money like sheep were eating it
2016
Watercoulour

The aim was to illustrate the old saying in a more contemporary light. Today, the rich can afford to buy all sorts of vanity purchases just to flaunt their wealth, so even though sheep are no longer to be seen in modern city life, the rich young man depicted in my work has still bought one. It’s no bother to him if his new purchase eats his cash, because there’s more than enough even for another sheep.


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Fanni Ihalainen
The grass is always greener on the other side of the fence
2016
Watercoulour


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Lea Ala-Ilomäki
A glint of money in the eye
2016
Watercoulour

This work is inspired by the proverb “A glint of money in the eye”. There is a manic look of greed on the face of the individual


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Mimosa Isomäki
Keep the purse strings tight
2016
Watercoulour


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Jeremias Jokila
Grazing sheep
2016
Watercoulour

Proverb “Money like sheep were eating it.” Green is connected with money + grass is green + sheep eat grass = Sheep eats money.


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Iiris Korjus
Money doesn’t grow on trees
2016
Watercoulour

Proverbs are generally playful and amusing. I wanted my work to reflect the same kind of irony that is expressed in the saying “Money doesn’t grow on trees”. So I made a dreamer of money pose in front of a money tree plant. This gives the proverb a new meaning and an amusing perspective! in the centre of the work.


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Veli-Matti Koskikallio
You can’t get rich with arms folded
2016
Watercoulour

You can’t rich with arms folded – or can you? I wanted to show how this proverb does not apply to certain people in our society.


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Anniina Marjakangas
For the crazy, fun is cheap – for idiots it’s free
2016
Watercoulour

The work was inspired by this saying, and the painting also portrays two young men, one crazy and one idiotic. In the painting, the crazy one needs something material, in this case a knife, with which he cuts himself for fun; while the idiot, in turn, laughs to himself at what the crazy one is doing.


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Juha Nguyen
You can’t get rich with arms folded
2016
Watercoulour


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Janni Perttunen
A coin in the box opens heaven to your soul
2016
Watercoulour

The work reflects on people’s relationship to charity and what the fundamental reasons for donating money can sometimes be – without accusing anyone, however.


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Suvi Reponen
Money attracts money
2016
Watercoulour

The inspiration for this work is the saying “Money attracts money”. Underlying the work is the idea of how money generally ends up in the hands of a chosen few and circulates merely in this small privileged circle, which its members dare not leave.


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Julia Salonen
It’s but a drop in the ocean
2016
Watercoulour


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Rosanna Tengvall
All that glitters is not gold
2016
Watercoulour


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Maria Tiihonen
KWalking in single file like the pigs on a poor farm
2016
Watercoulour

Initially, I had intended to make a sunny picture, with cute little pigs frolicking in a field in single file. Inspiration didn’t strike, however, do I decided to turn the whole idea on its head. This led to the work, in which large, gruff-looking boars march to work in an abattoir in their grey world. The “pigs on a poor farm” have grown to become adults whose only means to survive is to scrape a living in horrific working conditions. Isn’t it so that irony is the best source of inspiration?


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Tytti Tuomola
Stony broke
2016
Watercoulour

Reflects the student’s life situation.